A.D. 381 : heretics, pagans, and the dawn of the by Emperor of Rome Theodosius I; Emperor of Rome Theodosius I;

By Emperor of Rome Theodosius I; Emperor of Rome Theodosius I; Freeman, Charles

Examines the pivotal ways that Theodosius's decree mandating a Christian orthodoxy ended debates in regards to the nature of God, exploring the explanations why Theodosius's function used to be made to seem as a consensual ruling by means of the Council of Constantinople.

summary: Examines the pivotal ways that Theodosius's decree mandating a Christian orthodoxy ended debates in regards to the nature of God, exploring the explanations why Theodosius's function used to be made to seem as a consensual ruling through the Council of Constantinople

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After the collapse of the empire in the west, a very different Christianity emerged and faced a range of new challenges in the fragmented and often economically devastated societies of post-Roman Europe. So one starts a new chapter, a new analysis of how a Christianity that had flourished in the literate urban communities of late antiquity adapted to survival in rural societies in which literacy was almost nonexistent. Personally I find this approach to church history fruitful and absorbing. In this book, I focus more closely on the important transitions that took place in the relationship between Church and state in the last thirty years of the fourth century.

It was there that the remnants of Valens’ shattered armies, together with displaced officials, made their way. It was essential that a strong man be found, one who, unlike Valens, was a hardened soldier, to take control and regroup them. Gratian’s choice was a tough Spanish general, Flavius Theodosius. Theodosius was the son of Valentinian I’s Master of Cavalry, another Theodosius, who had played a crucial role in bringing the rebellions in Britain and Africa to an end. The elder Theodosius had taken his son on campaign with him, so Flavius Theodosius had spent his early life on the march.

The first that Valens may have heard of the crisis was in the autumn of 376, when envoys from the Goths arrived in Antioch, five hundred kilometres away from the border, pleading to be allowed into the empire. Valens’ response was probably dictated by his desperate need for manpower. He knew that here would be several thousand young men who would be glad of a place in the Roman armies, while other migrants could be settled as peasant farmers and then made subject to Roman taxation. This had happened before - it was one of the many strategies the Romans, who were always pragmatic in such things, had adopted in order to keep peace on the borders.

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